music

Parsifal – Richard Wagner’s Last Opera

Parsifal – Richard Wagner’s Last Opera

On July 26, 1882, Richard Wagner‘s last opera ‘Parsifal‘ premiered in the Festspielhaus at Bayreuth. Wagner described Parsifal not as an opera, but as “ein Bühnenweihfestspiel” (“A Festival Play for the Consecration of the Stage“). Initially, according to Wagner‘s will, Parsifal should only be allowed to be played at Bayreuth, because he wanted to prevent it from degenerating into ‘mere amusement‘ for an opera-going public. Wagner‘s compositions, particularly those of…
Edward William Elgar’s Pomp and Circumstances

Edward William Elgar’s Pomp and Circumstances

On June 2, 1857, English composer Sir Edward William Elgar was born. Many of his works have entered the British and international classical concert repertoire.  Among his best-known compositions are orchestral works including Enigma Variations, the Pomp and Circumstance Marches, concertos for violin and cello, and two symphonies. Edward William Elgar was born near the city of Worcester in the English West Midlands. His father owned a music shop and…
Henry Steinway and the Grand Pianos

Henry Steinway and the Grand Pianos

On February 15, 1797, German-born American inventor and entrepreneur Henry Engelhard Steinway was born. He invented the overstrung iron-frame grand piano (1859) and is founder of the piano company Steinway & Sons. Steinway was born Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg in Wolfshagen im Harz, Duchy of Brunswick in the Holy Roman Empire of the German Nation (modern Germany). His childhood was marked by many tragedies and twists of fate. He attended the…
Probably the best known composer of the world – Ludwig van Beethoven

Probably the best known composer of the world – Ludwig van Beethoven

On December 17, 1770, German composer and pianist Ludwig van Beethoven was born. He is considered a crucial figure in the transition between the Classical and Romantic eras in Western art music, he remains one of the most famous and influential of all composers. Born as the eldest of three children in Bonn, then the capital of the Electorate of Cologne and part of the Holy Roman Empire, Beethoven displayed…
Adolphe Sax and the Saxophone

Adolphe Sax and the Saxophone

Adolphe Sax (1814–1894)   On November 6, 1814, Belgian musical instrument designer and musician Antoine-Joseph “Adolphe” Sax was born. Besides playing flute and clarinet, he is well known for having invented the saxophone. Sax became something of a footnote in history after his creation was almost forgotten after his death, until it was revived by jazz musicians who barely remembered his name.[2] Back in the time when I was a student, I remember one fellow student…
Harvey Fletcher – the Father of Stereophonic Sound

Harvey Fletcher – the Father of Stereophonic Sound

Setup for the oil drop experiment. On September 11, 1884, US-american physicist Harvey Fletcher was born. Considered as the “father of stereophonic sound” he is credited with the invention of hearing aids and is well known for his contributions in acoustics, electrical engineering, speech, medicine, music, atomic physics, sound pictures, and education. Harvey Fletcher was raised in Utah in a religious community. He received his early education at he Brigham…
Niccoló Paganini – the Devil’s Violinist

Niccoló Paganini – the Devil’s Violinist

Niccoló Paganini (1782 – 1840) On May 27, 1840, Italian violinist and composer Niccolo Paganini passed away. He was the most celebrated violin virtuoso of his time, and left his mark as one of the pillars of modern violin technique. Already Paganini’s father made his living from music. He used to play the mandolin and also taught his third son Niccolò how to master the instrument. At the age of seven, the young…
Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle and the Marseillaise

Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle and the Marseillaise

Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle singing La Marseillaise On April 25, 1792, French army officier Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle during the French Revolution composes the ‘Chant de guerre pour l’armée du Rhin‘ for the declaration of war against Austria. Under the name ‘La Marseillaise‘ his song later becomes the national anthem of France. I’m pretty sure that almost everybody knows the French national anthem, the so-called Marseillaise, simply because of its numerous…
Laurens Hammond and the Hammond Organ

Laurens Hammond and the Hammond Organ

Hammond Organ model L-112 Image: Jake On April 24, 1934, American engineer and inventor Laurens Hammond filed US Patent 1,956,350 for an “electrical musical instrument“, his famous eponymous electric organ with the unique ‘Hammond sound’. Laurens was born in Illinois, USA, but moved to France after his father took his life. In  Europe, Hammond began to design some of his earliest inventions. By the age of 14, the boy had already…
Albert Schweitzer and his Hospital in Africa

Albert Schweitzer and his Hospital in Africa

Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) On March 21, 1913, theologian, organist, philosopher, physician, and medical missionary in Africa Albert Schweitzer together with his wife Helene start their voyage to Africa, to establish a hospital in Equatorial Africa. Albert Schweitzer was born on January 14, 1875, as the second child of a Lutheran-Evangelical priest’s family in Kaysersberg. Some months after his birth the family moved to Guensbach, Alsace, where Albert’s father worked as…
Relation Browser
Timeline
0 Recommended Articles:
0 Recommended Articles: