communication

Chester Carlson and Xerography

Chester Carlson and Xerography

On September 19, 1968, American physicist, inventor, and patent attorney Chester F. Carlson passed away. He is best known for having invented the process of electrophotography, which produced a dry copy rather than a wet copy, as was produced by the mimeograph process. Carlson’s process was subsequently renamed xerography, a term that literally means “dry writing.” It is believed that when Chester Carlson was about ten years old, he created a newspaper…
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Sir Rowland Hill and the Penny Post

Sir Rowland Hill and the Penny Post

On August 27, 1879, English teacher, inventor and social reformer Sir Rowland Hill passed away. Hill campaigned for a comprehensive reform of the postal system, based on the concept of Uniform Penny Post and his solution of prepayment, facilitating the safe, speedy and cheap transfer of letters. Hill later served as a government postal official, and he is usually credited with originating the basic concepts of the modern postal service, including the invention…
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Do you speak ASCII?

Do you speak ASCII?

On June 17, 1963, the American Standard Code for Information Interchange, or short better known as ASCII code was published as ASA X3.4-1963 by the American National Standards Institute. ASCII codes represent text in computers, communications equipment, and other devices that use text. Most modern character-encoding schemes are based on ASCII, though they support many additional characters. ASCII was the most common character encoding on the World Wide Web until December 2007,…
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Oliver Lodge and the Development of Radio Technology

Oliver Lodge and the Development of Radio Technology

On June 12, 1851, British physicist Sir Oliver Joseph Lodge was born. Lodge was involved in the development of, and holder of key patents for radio. He identified electromagnetic radiation independent of Hertz‘ proof and at his 1894 Royal Institution lectures, Lodge demonstrated an early radio wave detector he named the “coherer“.[4] Oliver Lodge joined his father’s business at the age of fourteen, becoming an agent selling Purbeck blue clay to the potteries,…
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Alexander Popov and his Radio Receiver

Alexander Popov and his Radio Receiver

On March 4, 1859, Russian physicist Alexander Stepanovich Popov was born. Alexander Popov is acclaimed in his homeland and eastern European countries as the inventor of radio. In 1895 he presented a paper on a wireless lightning detector he had built that worked via using a coherer to detect radio noise from lightning strikes. Born in the town Krasnoturinsk, Sverdlovsk Oblast in the Urals as the son of a priest, Popov became interested in…
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Louis Braille and the Braille System

Louis Braille and the Braille System

On January 4, 1809, French educator Louis Braille was born. He is best known for being the inventor of a system of reading and writing for use by the blind or visually impaired. His system remains known worldwide simply as braille. Access to communication in the widest sense is access to knowledge, and that is vitally important for us if we [the blind] are not to go on being despised or patronized by condescending sighted people. We do…
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Michael Pupin and the long-distance Phone Calls

Michael Pupin and the long-distance Phone Calls

On October 9, 1858, Serbian American physicist and physical chemist Michael Pupin was born, who is best known for his numerous patents, including a means of greatly extending the range of long-distance telephone communication by placing loading coils (of wire) at predetermined intervals along the transmitting wire (known as “pupinization“). Mihajlo Idvorsky Pupin was born in the village of Idvor (in the modern-day municipality of Kovačica, Serbia) in Banat, in the Military…
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The Unfortunate Inventions of Charles Cros

The Unfortunate Inventions of Charles Cros

Charles Cros (1842-1888) On October 1, 1842, French poet and inventor Charles Cros was born. He developed various improved methods of photography including an early color photo process. He also invented improvements in telegraph and paleophone technology. But lacking financial resources, he was unable to patent his devices before Thomas Edison and others developed the idea and started production. Émile-Hortensius-Charles Cros was born in Fabrezan, Aude, France, 35km to the East of Carcassonne.…
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Paul Nipkow and the Picture Scanning Technology

Paul Nipkow and the Picture Scanning Technology

Paul Nipkow (1860–1940) On August 22, 1860, German engineer Paul Gottlieb Nipkow was born. He is best known for having conceived the idea of using a spiral-perforated disk (the Nipkow disk), to divide a picture into a matrix of points, and became an early television pioneer. Nipkow was born on August 22, 1860, in Lauenburg (Lębork) in Pomerania, now in Poland. Inspired by the work of Guglielmo Marconi, Nipkow began thinking about…
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Taking All Moving Parts out of Television – Philo Taylor Farnsworth’s Electronic TV

Taking All Moving Parts out of Television – Philo Taylor Farnsworth’s Electronic TV

On August 19, 1906, American inventor and television pioneer Philo Taylor Farnsworth was born. As a pioneer in the development of electronic television, he counts responsible for taking all of the moving parts out of television inventions. Philo Taylor Farnsworth was born in Indian Creek near Beaver, Utah as the eldest of five children into a Mormon family. He moved to Idaho with his family, when he was about 12 years old. He was taught the…
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