transportation

The Clifton Suspension Bridge

The Clifton Suspension Bridge

Clifton Suspension Bridge On December 8, 1864, the Clifton Suspension Bridge spanning the Avon Gorge and the River Avon, designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, was openend for the public. Although Brunel was not able to see the bridge in operation anymore during his lifetime, the Clifton Suspension bridge was the first major commision of the famous engineer of the Great Western Railroad and the then largest steamships in the world.…
Tōkaidō Shinkansen – the Bullet Train

Tōkaidō Shinkansen – the Bullet Train

T?kaid? Shinkansen passing tea fields between Shizuoka and Kakegawa On October 1, 1964, the world’s first high speed train, the T?kaid? Shinkansen started operation between Tokyo and Osaka. Even though construction work started in 1959, the plans for the high speed train were made in the 1940s. It was planned to achieve a maximum speed of 150km/h and connect the city of Tokyo with Shimonoseki. With a speed of 150…
Road Trippin’ with Alice Ramsey

Road Trippin’ with Alice Ramsey

Alice Ramsey(1886 – 1983)Image: Library of Congress On August 7, 1909, Alice Ramsey together with her companions reached San Francisco, successfully finishing the first crossing of the USA with an automobile by a woman. She arrived at San Francisco 60 days after her start in New York. The journey began on June 9, 1909 in New York City. The four women got ready for a last photo shoot and kissed…
Karl Drais and the Mechanical Horse

Karl Drais and the Mechanical Horse

Karl Drais’ Laufmaschine On April 29, 1785, German inventor Karl Drais was born, who invented the Laufmaschine (“running machine”), also later called the velocipede or draisine, also nicknamed the dandy horse. Karl Drais became a teacher in a small town near Heidelberg, Germany in 1805 and only six years later, he was released of his duty to focus on his ideas and inventions he already had in mind. To his…
The Unsinkable Ship and the Iceberg

The Unsinkable Ship and the Iceberg

Statistics of Titanic’s Survivors from a Contemporary Newspaper, photo @lysander07 On April 15, 1912, 2:20 AM, British passenger liner Titanic sank after colliding with an iceberg in the North Atlantic during her maiden voyage from Southampton to New York City, US, causing more than 1,500 deaths. The RMS Titanic was one of the largest vessels of the White Star Line with a length of 269.06m (882 feet) and a total weight…
Stephenson’s Rocket wins the Rainhill Trials

Stephenson’s Rocket wins the Rainhill Trials

On October 8, 1829, George Stephenson‘s steam locomotive ‘The Rocket‘ won The Rainhill Trials, an important competition in the early days of steam locomotive railways, run in Rainhill, Lancashire (now Merseyside) for the nearly completed Liverpool and Manchester Railway. The Liverpool and Manchester Railway was about to get finished, it was the first twin-track inter city passenger railway and the operators did not know whether to use steam engines or…
The Opening of the Panama Canal

The Opening of the Panama Canal

On August 15, 1914, the very first ship, the cargo ship SS Ancon passed the newly built Panama Canal. Unfortunately, in the same month, World War I started fighting in Europe and the official opening ceremony had to be postponed until 1920. The Panama Canal is an 82 km long ship canal in Panama that connects the Atlantic Ocean (via the Caribbean Sea) to the Pacific Ocean and therefore also…
Fin de Siècle at its best – The Paris Métro

Fin de Siècle at its best – The Paris Métro

A Paris Métro Sign©Fabio Venni / cc-by-sa Version 2.0 On July 19 1900, Paris, cultural center of the Belle Époche, opened its Métro. The Paris Métro stations with their Fin de Siècle charme and Art Nouveau design have become a timeless icon of the city. Main achievements of the Exposition Universelle in 1900 were the introduction of escalators, talking films, the famous Eiffel Tower, and Ferris wheels. Rudolf Diesel exhibited…
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