SciHi Blog

The Bug that wasn’t really a Bug – Computer Pioneer Grace Murray Hopper

The Bug that wasn’t really a Bug – Computer Pioneer Grace Murray Hopper

The first documented computer bug in a 1947 log file © Naval Surface Warfare Center, Dahlgren, VA Most of you might think that computers is one of these men’s business things. Far from it! Not even that it was a girl who was the very first programmer in history – Ada Augusta King Countess of Lovelace – it was also a woman in the early days of computers, who developed the…
Not Simply a Piece of Marble – Michelangelo’s David

Not Simply a Piece of Marble – Michelangelo’s David

Michelangelo’s David(1501-1504) On September 8, 1504 Michelangelo’s David, a masterpiece of Renaissance sculpture, was unveiled in the city of Florence. The 5m high and 6t heavy marble statue depicts David, right before his fight with the enormous Philistine warrior Goliath, which is special because previous sculptures or art works, like the one’s by Andrea del Castagno or Donatello show David after the famous battle with Goliath’s head in David’s arms. The…
James van Allen and the Weather in Space

James van Allen and the Weather in Space

James Van Allen (1914-2006) in the middle with Wernher von Braun (right) On September 7, 1914, astrophysicist and space pioneer Dr. James Van Allen was born. The Van Allen radiation belts were named after him, following the 1958 satellite missions (Explorer 1 and Explorer 3) in which Van Allen had argued that a Geiger counter should be used to detect charged particles. “Apparently, something happens on the sun. It sends out…
Goethe’s Wanderers Nachtlied

Goethe’s Wanderers Nachtlied

Wanderers Nachtlied written on a wooden wall of the famous Goethe house on top of the Kickelhahn On September 6, 1780, the German poet Johann Wolfgang von Goethe wrote with a pencil on the wall of a wooden cabin on the Kickelhahn mountain in Ilmenau, Thuringia the poem ‘Wanderers Nachtlied‘.  Über allen Gipfeln Ist Ruh,  In allen Wipfeln Spürest du  Kaum einen Hauch;  Die Vögelein schweigen im Walde. Warte nur, balde Ruhest du auch. This poem…
Caspar David Friedrich and the German Romanticism

Caspar David Friedrich and the German Romanticism

Caspar David Friedrich: Das Eismeer (The Sea of Ice), 1823/24 On September 5, 1774, Caspar David Friedrich, one of the most important painters of the German Romanticism, was born. His best known works depict the numerous landscapes with their fogs barren trees, and ruins surrounding the contemplative and silhouetted characters. Caspar David Friedrich was born in Greifswald, Germany and had to go through a dramatic childhood. His mother died when…
Alexander Fleming and the Penicillin

Alexander Fleming and the Penicillin

Alexander Fleming (1888-1951)on a stamp from Faroe Islands On September 3, 1928, scottish pharmacologist Alexander Fleming by chance and because of his notorious untidyness discovered Penicillin. In 1927, Alexander Fleming was investigating the properties of staphylococci, a family of bacteria, most of them being harmless and residing on the human skin. Fleming was already well-known from his earlier work, and had developed a reputation as a brilliant researcher, but his…
Max Delbrück and the Genes

Max Delbrück and the Genes

Max Delbrück (1906-1981)Foto: Dr. Ernst Peter Fischer On September 4, 1906, German biophysicist and Nobel laureate Max Delbrück was born in Berlin. His best known achievement for that he won the Nobel prize was the discovy that bacteria become resistant to viruses (phages) as a result of genetic mutations. Max Delbrück’s father Hans Delbrück was a professor of history at the University of Berlin, and his mother was the granddaughter…
The German National Library

The German National Library

Deutsche Nationalbibliothek@Bundesarchiv: 183-1987-0925-016 On September 2, 1916 the opening of the ‘Deutsche Bücherei‘, i.e. the German National Library, was celebrated. Founded already in 1912, the German National Library has the task of preserving at least one copy of every book in print in Germany starting 1913. Today, almost every country has a national library for the preservation of its literary cultural heritage. The very first national library was established by…
The Great George Méliès and his Voyage to the Moon

The Great George Méliès and his Voyage to the Moon

Most famous scene in ‘A Trip to the Moon‘ 1902 On September 1, 1902, the French film pioneer George Méliès presented the very first science fiction movie to the stunning public of the Paris Olympia theater. George Méliès always had the desire to do something creative and innovative. As a young school boy, he could receive a formal education in private schools due to the wealth of his parents, who owned…
The Still Unsolved Case of Jack the Ripper

The Still Unsolved Case of Jack the Ripper

‘A Suspicious Character’ 1888source: Illustrated London News On August 31, 1888, the mutilated body of Mary Ann Nichols was found in Whitechapel, London. Her death has been attributed to the notorious unidentified serial killer Jack the Ripper, who is believed to have killed and mutilated five women in the Whitechapel area of London in 1888. The name Jack the Ripper origins from a letter distributed in London’s press. In it,…
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