Hermann Ebbinghaus and the Experimental Study of Memory

Hermann Ebbinghaus

Hermann Ebbinghaus

On January 24, 1850, German psychologist Hermann Ebbinghaus was born. Ebbinghaus pioneered the experimental study of memory, and is known for his discovery of the forgetting curve and the spacing effect.

Hermann Ebbinghaus was born in Barmen, in the Rhine Province of the Kingdom of Prussia and attended the University of Bonn where he intended to study history and philology. In 1870, his studies were interrupted when he served with the Prussian Army in the Franco-Prussian War. Ebbinghaus evolved a great interest in philosophy and finished his dissertation on Eduard von Hartmann’s Philosophie des Unbewussten (Philosophy of the Unconscious). After earning his doctorate degree in 1873, Ebbinghaus spent much time in Halle and Berlin and also traveled through England and France. It is assumed that Ebbinghaus took teachers positions while on travel and apparently he discovered Gustav Fechner’s book Elemente der Psychophysik (Elements of Psychophysics) while in London. The book highly inspred the young scientist to start his own research on memory studies.

Ebbinghaus’ famous work, Memory: A Contribution to Experimental Psychology was already published in 1885 and was so successful that he was appointed professor at the University of Berlin. Ebbinghaus and Arthur König founded the Psychological journal Zeitschrift für Physiologie und Psychologie der Sinnesorgane in 1890. Ebbinghaus joined the University of Breslau, Poland and studied how children’s mental ability declined during the school day. He also founded a psychological testing laboratory there. Die Grundzüge der Psychologie where published in 1902, which was an instant success. Two years later, Ebbinghaus moved to Halle. His last and quite successful work Abriss der Psychologie (Outline of Psychology) was published in 1908.

Contrary to most scientists studying higher mental processes, Ebbinghaus believed that research could be conducted through experiments. He developed a system recognizing the fact that learning is always affected by prior knowledge and understanding. Ebbinghaus figured that he would need something that would be memorized easily but without prior cognitive associations. The scientist created the socalled “nonsense syllables”. This can be understood as a consonant-vowel-consonant combination, where the consonant does not repeat and the syllable does not have prior meaning, like DAX, BOK, and YAT. After creating the collection of syllables, Ebbinghaus pulled out a number of random syllables from a box and then write them down in a notebook. Then, to the regular sound of a metronome, and with the same voice inflection, he would read out the syllables, and attempt to recall them at the end of the procedure. One investigation alone required 15,000 recitations.

However, there were also some limitations in Ebbinghaus’ work on memory. For instance, he was the only subject in the study and therefore it was not generalizability to the population. Also, a large bias is to be expected when a subject is a participant in the experiment as well as the researcher. Still, Ebbinghaus managed to contribute significantly to the research on memory. His most famous finding is probably the forgetting curve, which describes the exponential loss of information that one has learned. He found out that the sharpest decline occurs in the first twenty minutes and the decay is significant through the first hour. The curve levels off after about one day.

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