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Harald Sack

The First Woman in Space – Valentina Tereshkowa

The First Woman in Space – Valentina Tereshkowa

Valentina Tereshkowa together with Juri Gagarin in Berlin(© German Federal Archive) On June 16th 1963 Valentina Tereshkowa, the first woman went to space with Russian space mission Vostok 6. She was selected out of more than 400 applicants to pilot Vostok 6, becoming both the first woman and the first civilian to fly in space, as she was only honorarily inducted into the USSR’s Air Force as a condition on joining…
Benjamin Franklin and the Lightning Rod

Benjamin Franklin and the Lightning Rod

Benjamin Franklin 1706 – 1790 On June 15, 1752, Benjamin Franklin proved that lightning is electricity and invented the lightning rod through his experiments with kites. As you might know for sure, Benjamin Franklin wasn’t only an enthusiastic scientist, inventor, and author, but also one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. His roots lay back in Boston, where he was born in 1706 as the son of a…
Behold the First Commercial Computer (in the US) – the UNIVAC I

Behold the First Commercial Computer (in the US) – the UNIVAC I

UNIVAC I – Operator Console(Museum of Science, Boston, MA) On June 14, 1951 the very first electronic computer produced in series (and in the United States), the UNIVAC I (Universal Automatic Computer) was delivered to the US States Census Bureau at the price of $1.6 Mio. It was designed principally by J. Presper Eckert and John Mauchly, the inventors of the first general-purpose electronic computer, the ENIAC. Design work was begun…
The Case of the Last Condemned Witch – Anna Göldi

The Case of the Last Condemned Witch – Anna Göldi

Recreated Portrait of Anna Göldi by Patrick Lo Giudice(via http://www.walter-hauser.ch/) On June 13th 1782, the maidservant Anna Göldi from the tiny Swiss canton Glarus was executed by the sword as being one of the very last women in Europe condemned for witchcraft. Concerning her case also for the very first time the term ‘judicial murder’ has been coined. Anna Göldi came from a poor background and for seventeen years, she…
John A. Roebling – The Father of the the Brooklyn Bridge

John A. Roebling – The Father of the the Brooklyn Bridge

Brooklyn Bridge, New York City On June 12, 1806, engineer John Augustus Roebling was born. He was best known for the design of the Brooklyn Bridge. Sadly Roebling passed away 14 years before the famous bridge in New York City was opened. John A. Roebling was born in Mühlhausen, he spent all his school life in Thuringia and later enrolled at the Bauakademie in Berlin. He studied architecture, bridge construction,…
James Cook and the Great Barrier Reef

James Cook and the Great Barrier Reef

Replica of the HMS Endeavour sailed by Cook On June 11, 1770, sailor and explorer James Cook discovered the Great Barrier Reef while running aground and risking his ship, the HMS Endeavour, to sink. In 1745, James Cook moved away from his English hometown and began his apprenticeship as a grocer, but shortly after proved himself as incompetent for this kind of work. However, he started his increasing interest in…
The long tradition of the Annual Boat Race of Oxford and Cambridge

The long tradition of the Annual Boat Race of Oxford and Cambridge

Start of the Boat Race On June 10th 1829 the very first of now legendary annual boat races of Oxford and Cambridge on the river Thames took place. The race came about because two friends from Harrow School, Charles Wordsworth (nephew of the poet William Wordsworth), of Christ Church College, Oxford, and Charles Merrivale of St. John’s, Cambridge, met during the vacation in Cambridge, where Wordsworth’s father was master of Trinity.…
Although I Cannot Prove it… – The Famous Goldbach Conjecture

Although I Cannot Prove it… – The Famous Goldbach Conjecture

Letter of Christian Goldbach to Leonard Euler from June 7th, 1742 (German and Latin) On the 7th of June in the year of our Lord 1742, Prussian mathematician Christian Goldbach wrote a letter to his famous colleague Leonard Euler, which should make history. Well, at least in the mathematical world. In this letter Christian Goldbach refined an already previously stated conjecture from number theory concerning primes to his friend Euler,…
The Short but Influential Life of Stephen Crane

The Short but Influential Life of Stephen Crane

Stephen Crane (1871-1900) On June 5, 1900, famous american writer Stephen Crane died at age 28. Despite of his youth, he already had become one of the icons of american literature. Most famous is his american civil war novel ‘The Red Badge of Courage‘, which has been read by almost every american high school kid. Crane was one of America’s foremost realistic writers, and his works have been credited with…
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