Monthly Archives: April 2014

Vom Science Slam zur Bestsellerliste

Vor ein paar Jahren haben uns bei yovisto die Science Slam Videos begeistert. Insbesondere ist uns diese Medizinstudentin in Erinnerung geblieben, die mit Ihren kurios interessanten Ausführungen zum Darmrohr als Siegerin dieser Veranstaltung hervorging. Giulia Enders, 24 Jahre alt und Medizinstudentin hat es verstanden, mehr daraus zu machen und führt inzwischen mit ihrem Buch “Darm mit Charme: Alles über ein unterschätztes Organ” die deutsche Bestsellerliste Paperback-Sachbuch an. Im Mittelpunkt des…
James Parkinson and Parkinson’s Disease

James Parkinson and Parkinson’s Disease

Woodcut of a man suffering from Parkinson‘s disease published in 1886 On April 11, 1755, English apothecary surgeon, geologist, paleontologist, and political activist James Parkinson was born. He is most famous for his 1817 work, An Essay on the Shaking Palsy, in which he was the first to describe “paralysis agitans“, a condition that would later be renamed Parkinson‘s disease. James Parkinson was born in London. His father was an…
The Origins of Copyright Law

The Origins of Copyright Law

On April 10, 1710, the Statute of Anne, an act of the Parliament of Great Britain, was introduced. It was the first statute to provide for copyright regulated by the government and courts, rather than by private parties. With the introduction of the printing press to Britain by William Caxton in 1476, printed works became nore and more important as an economic asset. As early as 1483, King Richard III…
Charles Baudelaire and the Flowers of Evil

Charles Baudelaire and the Flowers of Evil

Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) On April 9, 1821, French poet Charles Baudelaire was born. He produced notable work as an essayist, art critic, and pioneering translator of Edgar Allan Poe. Baudelaire is most famous work, Les Fleurs du mal (The Flowers of Evil), expresses the changing nature of beauty in modern, industrializing Paris during the 19th century. Baudelaire is considered one of the major innovators in French literature. His themes of…
Kamerlingh Onnes and Superconductivity

Kamerlingh Onnes and Superconductivity

Heike Kamerlingh Onnes (1853 – 1926) On April 8, 1911, Dutch physicist and Nobel Laureate Heike Kamerlingh Onnes found that at a temperature of only 4.2 K (-269° C) the resistance in a solid mercury wire immersed in liquid helium suddenly vanished. Kamerlingh Onnes discovered superconductivity. Born in Groningen, Netherlands, Kamerlingh also attended the city’s university and studied under the famous Robert Bunsen and Gustav Kirchhoff at the University of Heidelberg…
William Wordsworth and the Romantic Age of English Literature

William Wordsworth and the Romantic Age of English Literature

William Wordsworth (1770-1850) On April 7, 1770, major English Romantic poet William Wordsworth was born. Together with with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Wordsworth helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with the 1798 joint publication Lyrical Ballads. William Wordsworth was born at Cockermouth in Cumberland, son of John Wordsworth, who worked as an agent and rent collector for Sir James Lowther. Wordsworth’s father, although frequently away from home on…
John Jacob Astor and the American Fur Company

John Jacob Astor and the American Fur Company

John Jacob Astor (1763 – 1848) On April 6, 1808, Johann Jacob Astor founded the American Fur Company in New York. The company grew to monopolize the fur trade in the United States by 1830, and became one of the largest businesses in the country and John Jacob Astor became the first multi-millionaire in the United States. John Jacob Astor was born near Heidelberg, Germany and his career began at…
Jacob Roggeveen and the Easter Island

Jacob Roggeveen and the Easter Island

Map of Jacob Roggeveen’s voyage in 1722 On April 5, 1722, Dutch seafarer Jacob Roggeveen is the first European to discover the Polynesian island Rapa Nui, which he names Easter Island. Arend Roggeveen was an accomplished scholar and teacher in mathematics, astronomy, and navigational theory. He managed to obtain a charter from the States-General of the United Netherlands in order to head towards the South Sea in 1675. Unfortunately, he…
The Last German Lawsuit on Witchcraft

The Last German Lawsuit on Witchcraft

Leaflet about the Burning of a Witch, 1533 On April 4, 1775, Anna Schwegelin is the last woman to be tried for witchcraft in a German court. Although she was sentenced to death by decapitation, the judgement was never executed. The classical period of witchhunts in Europe and North America falls into the Early Modern period or about 1480 to 1750, spanning the upheavals of the Reformation and the Thirty…
The Legend of the Pony Express

The Legend of the Pony Express

Illustrated Map of Pony Express Route in 1860by William Henry Jackson~ Courtesy the Library of Congress ~ On April 3, 1860, the Pony Express started delivering messages, newspapers, mail, even small packages from St. Joseph, Missouri across the Great Plains, over the Rocky Mountains and the Sierra Nevada to Sacramento, California by horseback, using a series of relay stations. Although being an economic disaster, the Pony Express has become a…
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