Monthly Archives: January 2014

Umberto Nobile and his Airships

Umberto Nobile and his Airships

On January 21, 1885, Italian aeronautical engineer and Arctic explorer Umberto Nobile was born. He was a developer and promoter of semi-rigid airships during the Golden Age of Aviation. Nobile is primarily remembered for designing and piloting the airship Norge, which may have been the first aircraft to reach the North Pole. Umberto Nobile graduated from the University of Naples with a degree in engineering and began working on the…
The World according to Sebastian Münster

The World according to Sebastian Münster

Sebastian Münster (1488-1552) On January 20, 1488, German cartographer, cosmographer, and a Christian Hebraist scholar Sebastian Münster was born. His work, the Cosmographia from 1544, was the earliest German description of the world. In (Western) Germany, he is best known for his portrait on the former German 100 DM banknote – of course only to people who are old enough to remember the old banknotes (valid from 1962-1991). Sebastian Münster…
Who remembers Apple’s Lisa?

Who remembers Apple’s Lisa?

The Apple Lisa (2) On January 19, 1983, the Apple Lisa was introduced, the first personal computer to offer a graphical user interface in an inexpensive machine aimed at individual business users. Although a commercial failure, the Lisa paved the way for the famous Apple MacIntosh released in 1984. I don’t know if you are old enough to remember the early 1980s. But the era of personal computers had just…
Caspar Friedrich Wolff – the Founder of Embryology

Caspar Friedrich Wolff – the Founder of Embryology

Ontogenesis of a chick, drawn by Caspar Friedrich Wolff On January 18, 1734, German physiologist Caspar Friedrich Wolff was born. He is recognized as one of the founders of embryology. In Theoria Generationis (1759) he first wrote an epigenetic theory of development: that the organs of living things take shape gradually from non-specific tissue. At the age of 19, Caspar Friedrich Wolff started his studies in medicine in Berlin where…
August Weismann – the Founder of Neo-Darwinism

August Weismann – the Founder of Neo-Darwinism

Friedrich Leopold August Weismann(1834 – 1914) On January 17, 1834, German evolutionary biologist Friedrich Leopold August Weismann was born. He is considered the second most notable evolutionary theorist of the 19th century, after Charles Darwin, and one of the founders of neo-Darwinism. Adam Weismann grew up in a very religious home, with his father being a teacher and theologian. Weismann started receiving piano lessons at the age of 14 and…
Hildegard of Bingen – More than the ‘Sybil of the Rhine’

Hildegard of Bingen – More than the ‘Sybil of the Rhine’

St Hildegard von Bingen (1098-1179) Although her exact birthdate is uncertain, we want to dedicate today’s article to an extraordinary woman in science: German writer, composer, philosopher, Christian mystic, Benedictine abbess, visionary, and polymath St Hildegard von Bingen. At a time when few women wrote, Hildegard, known as “Sybil of the Rhine“, produced major works of theology and visionary writings. She used the curative powers of natural objects for healing,…
All the World’s Knowledge – Wikipedia

All the World’s Knowledge – Wikipedia

On January 15, 2001, the online encyclopedia Wikipedia was officially launched by Jimmy Wales and Larry Sanger. Wikipedia’s 30 million articles in 287 languages, including over 4.3 million in the English Wikipedia (as of Jan 2014), are written collaboratively by volunteers around the world. It is the largest and most popular general reference work on the Internet. Do you remember how life was before there was Wikipedia? Even if you…
The Rediscovery of Laocoön and His Sons

The Rediscovery of Laocoön and His Sons

Hagesandros, Athenedoros, and Polydoros On January 14, 1506, Felice de Fredis rediscovered the statue of Laocoön and his Sons in his vinyards close to the ruins of Emperor Nero’s Golden House palace on the Esquilin hill in Rome. The discovery of the Laocoön made a great impression on Italian artists and continued to influence Italian art into the Baroque period. Laocoön was a Trojan priest of Poseidon. The story of…
Wilhelm Weinberg and the Genetic Equilibrium

Wilhelm Weinberg and the Genetic Equilibrium

Hardy–Weinberg principle for two alleles On January 13, 1908, German physician and obstetrician-gynecologis Wilhelm Weinberg delivered an exposition of his ideas on the principle of genetic equilibrium in a lecture before the Verein für vaterländische Naturkunde in Württemberg. He developed the idea of genetic equilibrium independently of British mathematician G. H. Hardy. Wilhelm Weinberg studied medicine at the Universities of Berlin, Tübingen, and Munich, Germany. He returned to his birth…
Deep Impact and the Comet 9P/Tempel

Deep Impact and the Comet 9P/Tempel

The head-on collision of comet 9P/Tempel 1 and the Deep Impact impactor On January 12, 2005, NASA space probe Deep Impact was launched. It was designed to study the interior composition of the comet 9P/Tempel, by releasing an impactor into the comet, which successfully collided with the comet’s nucleus. This was the first time, that research on the inner conditions of a comet was nearly possible. The ejected pieces of…
Relation Browser
Timeline
0 Recommended Articles:
0 Recommended Articles: