Monthly Archives: October 2013

Ninety-Five Theses that Changed the World

Ninety-Five Theses that Changed the World

Pamphlet to the first memory of the publication of the theses of Martin Luther in 1517 On the eve of All Saint’s Day, October 31, 1517, Martin Luther posted the ninety-five theses, which were part of his dissertation criticizing on practices within the Catholic Church regarding baptism and absolution, on the door of the Castle Church of Wittenberg, according to university custom. This event is widely regarded as the initial…
The “King of Bombs” and the Craze of Cold War Nuclear Armament

The “King of Bombs” and the Craze of Cold War Nuclear Armament

Zone of total destruction of the Tsar Bomba on a map of Paris: red circle = total destruction On October 30, 1961, the Soviet Union detonated the hydrogen bomb Tsar Bomba over Novaya Zemlya, which still is the largest explosive device ever detonated, nuclear or otherwise. Just to get an idea of the bomb’s power, the Tsar Bomba measured ten times the power of all explosives used during World War…
The Birth of the Internet

The Birth of the Internet

On October 29, 1969, the very first message between two distant computer nodes, from the Network Measurement Center at the UCLA’s School of Engineering and Applied Science and SRI International (SRI) was sent. This is to be considered the birth of the ARPANET, which should become the Internet. What was the reason for the development of the Internet? Especially in the 1960s, when computers were absolutely not widespread or ubiquitous…
Liberty enlightening the world

Liberty enlightening the world

Statue of Liberty On October 28, 1886, U.S. president Grover Cleveland, the former New York governor, presided the dedication ceremony of the Statue of Liberty, a gift to the United States from the people of France. It is not really clear, what the origins of the Statue of Liberty really were. Sculptor Frédéric Bartholdi once stated that he got inspired while staying at a dinner party with  Édouard René de…
Erasmus of Rotterdam – Prince of the Humanists

Erasmus of Rotterdam – Prince of the Humanists

On October 27, 1466,  Dutch Renaissance humanist, Catholic priest, social critic, teacher, and theologian Desiderius Erasmus Roterdamus, also known as Erasmus of Rotterdam was born. He was the dominant figure of the early-16th-century humanist movement. Erasmus was given the best education possible during these years. Along with his older brother, he attended Latin schools where he also learned Greek. He became a priest and secretary to the Bishop of Cambrai…
The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral

The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral

The city of Tombstone in 1881 At about 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, October 26, 1881, in Tombstone, Arizona Territory, the most famous gunfight in the history of the American Old West took place. The gunfight, believed to have lasted only about thirty seconds, was fought between the outlaw Cowboys Billy Claiborne, Ike and Billy Clanton, and Tom and Frank McLaury, and the opposing town Marshal Virgil Earp and his brothers…
Charles Martell and the Battle of Tours and Poitiers

Charles Martell and the Battle of Tours and Poitiers

Charles Martel (718-748)from “Promptuarii Iconum Insigniorum” (1553) On October 25, 732 AD, the Battle of Tours and Poitiers between the united Frankish and Burgundian forces under Austrasian Mayor of the Palace Charles Martel, against an army of the Umayyad Caliphate led by Abdul Rahman Al Ghafiqi, Governor-General of al-Andalus, ended the Islamic expansion era in Europe. It is argued among historians that Charles Martel’s victory was one of the most…
The Peace of Westphalia and the End of the Thirty Year’s War

The Peace of Westphalia and the End of the Thirty Year’s War

The Ratification of the Treaty of Munster, Painting by Gerard Ter Borch (1648) On October 24, 1648, the signing of the Peace of Westphalia treaty in Osnabrück and Münster put an end to Europe’s Thirty Years’ War (1618 – 1648) in the Holy Roman Empire, and the Eighty Years’ War (1568 – 1648) between Spain and the Dutch Republic, with Spain formally recognizing the independence of the Dutch Republic. “In…
The Last Lecture of Randy Pausch

The Last Lecture of Randy Pausch

Randy Pausch(1960 – 2008) On October 23, 1960, professor of computer science and human-computer interaction Randy Pausch was born. He is best known for a lecture titled “The Last Lecture: Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams” he gave after he had learned that he had pancreatic cancer, which became rather popular on youtube. Randy Pausch studied at Brown University and received his Ph.D. in computer science at Carnegie Mellon University in…
André-Jacques Garnerin and the First Parachutes

André-Jacques Garnerin and the First Parachutes

Garnerin releases the balloon & descends with the help of a parachute, 1797. Illustration from the late 19th century. On October 22, 1797, French balloonist and inventor André Garnerin, made the first safe descent with a silk parachute from a ballon at Parc Monceau, Paris. Bold Garnerin went up Which increased his Repute And came safe to earth In his Grand Parachute. André Garnerin was a student of Jaques Charles. Charles was a…
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