Yearly Archives: 2013

The British East India Company

The British East India Company

Boston Tea Party On December 31, 1600, the British East India Company (EIC) received a Royal Charter from Queen Elizabeth making it the oldest among several similarly formed European East India Companies pursuing trade with the East Indies. Already 12 years before, the Spanish Armada was defeated and merchants turned to the Queen, asking for permission to sail to the Indian Ocean, which was granted. Some smaller companies formed, but…
The Convention of Tauroggen

The Convention of Tauroggen

Original Signature of Count Yorck von Wartenburg under the Convention of Tauroggen On December 30, 1812, Prussian General Johann David Ludwig Count of Yorck von Wartenburg on his own initiative without permission of the Prussian King decleared a local ceasefire with the Russian General Hans Karl von Diebitsch-Sabalkanski at Tauroggen. The eponymous Convention of Tauroggen marks the starting point of Europe’s Liberation Wars against Napoleon Bonaparte. Today, Tauroggen, or Taurogé,…
There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom

There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom

Richard Feynman On December 29, 1959, American physicist and Nobel Laureate Richard Feynman at an American Physical Society meeting at Caltech gave a presentation entitled ‘There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom‘, which is generally considered to be a seminal event in the history of nanotechnology, as it inspired the conceptual beginnings of the field decades later. At yovisto blog, Richard Feynman already is some sort of an old acquaintance.…
Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau and the Expressionism in German Cinema

Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau and the Expressionism in German Cinema

A screenshot of the 1922 film, Nosferatu Author: F.W. Murnau On December 28, 1888, Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau was born. He was one of the most influential German film directors of the silent era, and a prominent figure in the expressionist movement in German cinema during the 1920s. Murnau‘s best known work was his 1922 film Nosferatu, an adaptation of Bram Stoker‘s Dracula. Friedrich Wilhelm Murnau was actually born as Friedrich…
George Cayley and the Science of Aeronautics

George Cayley and the Science of Aeronautics

George Cayley (1773 – 1857) On December 27, 1773, English engineer and important pioneer of aeronautics Sir George Cayley was born. Many consider him the first true scientific aerial investigator and the first person to understand the underlying principles and forces of flight. George Cayley was the son of the 5th baronet and inherited several estates himself. He started several engineering projects during his early years, like self-righting lifeboats or…
Frederick II – The “Wonder of the World”

Frederick II – The “Wonder of the World”

Frederick II (1194 – 1250) On December 26, 1194, Frederick II, one of the most powerful Holy Roman Emperors of the Middle Ages and head of the House of Hohenstaufen was born. Speaking six languages (Latin, Sicilian, German, French, Greek and Arabic), Frederick was an avid patron of science and the art, called by a contemporary chronicler stupor mundi (the wonder of the world). In 1196, the only two year…
Goethe’s Muse Charlotte von Stein

Goethe’s Muse Charlotte von Stein

Goethe and Charlotte von Stein On December 25, 1742, Charlotte Albertine Ernestine von Stein was born. She was a lady-in-waiting at the court in Weimar and famous for being a close friend to both Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller, whose work and life were strongly influenced by her. We already have had several articles on the works and life of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe at yovisto Blog. No…
Christmas Eve 1906 – The World’s First Radio Broadcast

Christmas Eve 1906 – The World’s First Radio Broadcast

Penny Postcard of Reginald Fessenden’s Brant Rock, Massachusetts radio tower It was on Christmas Evening in 1906, when Reginald Fessenden broadcasted the very first radio program in the United States including a speech by Fessenden, music from the phonograph, a violin solo, and a short reading of the bible heard on the US-Atlantic-Coasters. Reginald Fessenden was educated at the Trinity College in Ontario followed by the Bishop’s College School in…
The Nuremberg Chronicle and the History of the World

The Nuremberg Chronicle and the History of the World

Woodcut of Nuremberg, Nuremberg Chronicle On December 23, 1493, the German version of the Nuremberg Chronicle – in German ‘Schedelsche Weltchronik‘ – was published. It is one of the best-documented early printed books – an incunabulum – and one of the first to successfully integrate illustrations and text. Moreover, it was the most extensively illustrated book of the 15th century. OK, unless you are not a book history afficionado, a…
The World’s Fastest Aircraft – Lockheed SR-71

The World’s Fastest Aircraft – Lockheed SR-71

The SR-71B Blackbird, flown by the Dryden Flight Research Center as NASA 831 slices across the snow-covered southern Sierra Nevada Mountains of California On December 22, 1964, the Lockheed SR-71 Mach 3+ strategic reconnaissance aircraft started for her maidenflight. Since 1976, it has held the world record for the fastest air-breathing manned aircraft. The SR-71’s predecessor was the reconnaissance aircraft U-2. But it was known to be very slow and…
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